Taking Christ to Patrons of Local Clubs and Bars

09_4C_Pub1_JNBy Jennifer Johnson

It took a trip to Bosnia for Daron Earlewine to launch a new ministry in America.

“The coffee shops become pubs in the evening,” he says. “At midnight they close and all the adults go to dance clubs. It dawned on me the same thing happens in every town in America—adults are gathering at bars and clubs. And if we could find a way to ‘own’ those rooms, we could impact thousands of people.”

Earlewine, then on staff at East 91st Street Christian Church in Indianapolis, also played drums in a rock band. He suggested they try to get booked in a local bar, and in the spring of 2009 they held their first Pub Theology event.

“It was pretty simple, actually,” Earlewine says. “We played music, introduced a charity, and took donations, did a two-minute teaching time, and invited people to anonymously text me questions about God and faith, which I answered on the spot.”

Monthly events became weekly. A DJ or acoustic singer-
songwriter now provides the music, giving Earlewine more time to talk with people who attend without “trying to have a meaningful conversation over screaming guitars.” He expanded the teaching time to five minutes, includes games and giveaways, and continues interviewing leaders of charities and answering text questions.

“Of course, there’s been some pushback,” he says. “I’ve had many meetings with our elders who support it but are wary of glorifying drinking. But when they attend our gatherings or hear stories of life change and baptisms, they realize we’re reaching people we might never reach otherwise.”

Earlewine has also developed a friendship with one of Indy’s top morning radio DJs, and twice a month he’s live on the show to answer questions about God and life during “Therapy Thursday.”

“It’s amazing what happens when we step out to the fringes,” he says. “I had no idea the impact we would have on the lives of people who were far from God. We’re taking the gospel to the everyday places of people’s lives and surprising them with his love.”

www.pubtheologyindy.com

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3 Comments

  1. Administrator Author
    September 19, 2013 at 11:10 am

    THIS COMMENT ABOUT THIS ARTICLE WAS MAILED TO CHRISTIAN STANDARD AS A LETTER TO THE EDITOR, AND WE HAVE CHOSEN TO POST IT HERE.

    ________

    In 1955, Dale Evans wrote the song “The Bible Tells Me So.” This song recites a portion of 1 Corinthians 13:13, “Faith, hope and charity.” This verse and the whole chapter has been taught and quoted over and over again. I was deeply hurt when I saw in the September issue of the CHRISTIAN STANDARD a picture of a banner displaying the words, “Faith – Hope – Love – Beer.” I am saddened to see this happen as STANDARD promotes social drinking as an acceptable lifestyle. At one time, Standard Publishing printed “Temperance Lessons” every quarter for the adult Sunday school class. Has Proverbs 20:1 been forgotten? “Wine is a mocker and beer a brawler; whoever is led astray by them is not wise.” The Bible clearly states in 1 Corinthians 6:10 that a drunkard will not inherit the kingdom of God. Social drinking is a step toward drunkenness. Statistics show that drinking and driving causes deadly auto accidents, and this situation continues to increase. Cost to treat alcoholism in the workplace is climbing each year. Crime and divorce are often alcohol-related.

    I wonder how a heartbroken mother feels, when she is dealing with her child’s addiction to alcohol, as she reads the words “Pub Theology”?

    Please, may the STANDARD once again be the “standard bearer” for the Word of God.
    —Pete Taylor, retired minister
    Hamilton, Ohio

  2. Administrator Author
    October 23, 2013 at 9:14 am

    THIS COMMENT ABOUT THIS ARTICLE WAS MAILED TO CHRISTIAN STANDARD AS A LETTER TO THE EDITOR, AND WE HAVE CHOSEN TO POST IT HERE.

    ________

    The September 2013 issue has me quite disturbed. I have reference to at least three articles in recent issues that promote and glorify the drinking of alcoholic beverages. It was quite a shock to see posters [in photos] in the issue that said “Faith, Hope, Love, Beer.” My first thought is, What has this publication become? How did it sink so low?

    I’ll not try to comment on everything the articles say. Some things make sense—some don’t. But my real concern is with the magazine’s editor and writers. Are the editors and writers totally oblivious to the crime, heartache, ruin, broken homes, abused wives, and children, etc., that are caused by the consumption of alcoholic beverages? Perhaps both the editor and writers would be forced to use some sort of rationalization to condone the article(s) and assumed that since the magazine approved of drinking alcohol it would be all right and that action led to some kind of disaster or catastrophe. (Could there already be some rationalization going on?)

    I (and some others who have spoken to me) am totally disappointed and confused by the articles that apparently approve and even promote drinking alcohol.

    My final thought and question is this: In light of the pro-alcohol articles printed, what is next? Can we expect to see on the inside back cover of a future issue a full-page Budweiser or Coors beer ad?
    —James Adkins, retired minister and longtime reader
    Selmer, TN

  3. Administrator Author
    October 23, 2013 at 10:39 am

    Please also see John Caldwell’s article, “To Drink or Not to Drink.” As is true with the articles mentioned above, Brother Caldwell’s article brought many strong responses. (See https://christianstandard.com/2012/08/to-drink-or-not-to-drink/).
    It seems clear our readers do not agree on this issue.
    It should also seem clear that no one is advocating drunkenness or wanton drinking but suggesting a willingness to share a drink with a non-Christian friend in an effort to build a relationship and point him to Christ.
    Some are doing this for the glory of God. Others are avoiding it for the glory of God. Each side believes the other is wrong, and most of us can understand why.
    This is a case of allowing vs. advocating. Be assured there will be no beer ads in Christian Standard.
    Mark A. Taylor, Editor

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