12 June, 2021

June 6 | House of David Established

by | 31 May, 2021 | 0 comments

INTRODUCTION TO JUNE LESSONS
Israel reached her zenith during the reigns of Kings David and Solomon. The only reign to surpass them would be the coming of the true Son of David, Jesus Christ. This month, students will learn of the house (kingdom) of David being established, threatened, rescued, and secured.

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Unit: History of Israel (2 Samuel; 1 & 2 Chronicles)
Theme: A King’s House
Lesson Text: 2 Samuel 7:8-26
Supplemental
Text: 1 Chronicles 17; Luke 1:31-32
Aim: Praise God for Jesus, son of David.

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Download a PDF of this week’s lesson material (the Study by Mark Scott, Application by David Faust, and Discovery Questions by Michael C. Mack): LOOKOUT_June6_2021

Send an email to [email protected] to receive PDFs of the lesson material each month.

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By Mark Scott

House is a word of many nuances. In our lesson text alone, it can mean home, lineage, people, temple, kingdom, place, children, ancestors, offspring, nation, and throne. David’s house was ready to be established. King Saul was dead (2 Samuel 1), and David had put down his enemies (chapters 2, 5). David solidified his leaders (chapters 3–4) and brought the ark of the covenant to Jerusalem (chapter 6). Now the time had come for David to consider building something more permanent for God to dwell in rather than just a tent (though God liked the mobility of the tabernacle—2 Samuel 7:6).

Nathan to David: A House Delayed
2 Samuel 7:8-17

Whether or not Nathan spoke presumptuously about David building a temple cannot be determined (2 Samuel 7:3). But God informed Nathan that the temple contract would not be awarded to David. That did not mean, however, that God would not establish his plan to save the world through David—in fact, it was quite the opposite. Nathan reminded this special servant (used six times in this text) of five major actions of the Lord Almighty (Lord of the army or hosts) on David’s behalf. God took him from tending the flock (1 Samuel 16:11-12). God appointed David a ruler (prince or governor). God was with David. God cut off David’s enemies and gave him rest from them. Finally, God chose to make his name great.

In addition to what God did for David, it was apparent what God would do for Israel. He would provide a place for Israel and plant them so they could have a home. God would see to it that no one would disturb (shake up) them and that their enemies could not defeat them.

David desired to build a house for God, but that task would fall to Solomon. When David died (rest with your ancestors) God would raise up David’s offspring (seed) to build a house for his Name. The Jerusalem temple was just one part of God establishing his kingdom. The temple would not last forever (2 Chronicles 36:17-21; Matthew 24:1-35), but what God was establishing through David’s family would be eternal. Kings, such as Solomon, may disobey (and will be punished with floggings), but God’s love (chesed, i.e., his loyal love) would not be removed like King Saul was. God’s covenantal love will stay in place forever, and his kingdom and throne will stay in place forever (Luke 1:31-33).

David to God: A Promise Kept
2 Samuel 7:18-26

If David was disappointed with not being able to build the temple, it cannot be discerned from this passage. He seemed humbled and overwhelmed God would have any regard for him and his descendants. David went and sat before the Sovereign Lord (a title that appears seven times in this text). He found it hard to conceive God would bring a shepherd boy this far. He acknowledged he was a mere human. David’s self-perception was one of humiliation, but his view of God was one of exaltation. David was granted his request about God’s temple being built, and that was sufficient for him. He reckoned with the fact that God would act for the sake of his own word and according to his own will.

David gave full vent to his doxology. He spoke of God’s greatness and exclusivity (no one like you and no God but you). Then he spoke of what God had done to Israel. God had redeemed Israel from Egyptian bondage. In doing so, God had made a name for himself. Part of redeeming Israel involved great and awesome wonders (Exodus 7–14). But these miracles were also in play in the conquest narrated in the book of Joshua. God drove out nations and their gods so he could establish his people in the land of promise. In these great redemptive acts the Lord became their God.

God does not have amnesia. He does not need people (even kings) to remind him of his promises. But in a spirit of reverence, David requested God keep the promise to build the temple and establish the kingdom. David’s true motives show up by being more concerned about God’s name than his own reputation. If God established the house, then it would become clear the Lord Almighty was (and is) God over Israel, and the promise to Abraham was alive and well (Genesis 12:1-3).

Real estate agents stress the importance of location. That held true in locating the temple in Jerusalem, but only as a place for the Lord’s name to sound forth through all the earth.

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